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Green Card Eligibility based on Special Immigrant Juvenile Classification

 

The Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) classification provides special children who have been subjected to state juvenile court proceedings in connection with abuse, neglect, abandonment, or a similar basis under state law to seek lawful permanent residence in the United States. USCIS determines if a juvenile is eligible for SIJ classification by adjudicating a Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant. The USCIS Policy Manual, Volume 6, Part J – Special Immigrant Juveniles bears more useful information for this procedure.

 

For the eligibility of adjustment of the status, one must file an application for the registration of Permanent Residence or Adjustment of status through Form I-485 and it is important to be physically present during the filing for it. After the Inspection and Admission by the USCIS gaining approval of the Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant, the petitioner will be regarded as an SIJ.

There is no certain age limit to abide by in order to apply for a Green card as an SIJ.

If a situation so arises that one had filed their Form I-360 at an age lower than 21, their SJI-based Form I-485 will not be denied if their age by then is older than 21. One must be unmarried during the filing of the adjustment application and during the final adjudication of the form.

 

The only time when the adjustment of the status can be barred if there is any history of any act of violation. For the Green Card, one must be admissible to the nation; as a Special Immigrant Juvenile, one is exempted from the grounds of Inadmissibility as mentioned in INA 212(a).  In cases of Inadmissibility, a waiver will be provided by the law or some other form of relief to subjugate the inadmissibility. One can apply for a waiver of inadmissibility or other forms of relief through a Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, and Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States after Deportation or Removal.

 

Immigrant visas for Special Immigrant Juveniles stem from the visa category of EB-4 for special immigrants.

The requisite documents are :

  • Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status;
  • Copy of the Form I-797, Approval or Receipt Notice, for the Form I-360 SIJ petition (unless the filing of the Form I-360 is done together with the Form I-485);
  • Two passport-style photographs;
  • Copy of a government-issued identity document with photograph (if available);
  • Copy of the birth certificate;
  • Copy of the passport page with the nonimmigrant visa (if applicable);
  • Copy of the passport page with the admission or parole stamp (if applicable);
  • Copy of the Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record, or copy of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) admission or parole stamp on the travel document (if applicable);
  • Certified police and court records of any juvenile delinquency findings, criminal charges, arrests, or convictions (if applicable);
  • Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (if applicable);
  • Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal (if applicable); and
  • Documentation of past or present J-1 or J-2 nonimmigrant status (if applicable), including proof of compliance with or waiver of the 2-year foreign residence requirement under INA 212(e) (for more information, see Form I-612, Application for Waiver of the Foreign Residence Requirement).

 

For family members, one may file a petition for the qualifying family members through the process of Immigration based on Family after the person is granted the Green card.

If one is granted a Green Card based on their SIJ classification and it is naturalized in the future, they can apply for their natural or prior adoptive parents to get a Green Card. This is applicable even for a caring, custodial parent.

 

Generally, if one has a pending Form I-485 and they leave the United States without an advance parole document, their application will be abandoned. In case of a pending Form I-485, one may apply for employment authorization by filing a Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization.

 

 

ASYLUM BASED ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY

Social groups have been regarded as one of the most important grounds for granting asylum, especially when they are based on unchangeable and immutable factors. Therefore several categories come under the definition of Social groups. 

With reference to some of the early decisions in Matter of Toboso-Alfonso, 20 I&N Dec. 819 (B.I.A. 1990), Pitcherskaia v. INS, 118 F.3d 641 (9th Cir. 1997), and Hernandez-Montiel v. INS, 225 F.3d 1084 (9th Cir. 2000) , the courts have recognized sexual orientation to be a social group , people who identity to be homosexual and transgender with special regard. 

Although in most of the scenarios, it has been noticed that most of the denials of asylum in the LGBTQ community stems from issues relating to inability to establish the alleged facts or from legal technicalities, but if any individual is to face persecution on account of their sexual orientation or gender identity, here are some of the documents one is required to provide during the hearing : 

 

  • Details of the incident of harm during the asylum application and testimony: Name, Date, Facts, and Reasoning for believing the occurrence to be persecution on account of being a part of the LGBT+ community.  
  • Evidence of membership in the LGBTQ+ community to be regarded as a member of the social group. 
  • Information about the native country and proof of ostracization or brutality faced there by the individual owing to their gender orientation or sexuality. ( One can go through the U.S. Department of State ” Country Reports on Human Rights ” for information to support their claim. )

All of the documents, applications, and testimonials must be plausible, comprehensive, and concordant to the facts claimed to establish one’s plea firmly to the Immigration judge or officer in question. It will increase the chances of their asylum being granted. 

 

In order to prove the LGBTQ+ identity, it is necessary to submit copies of the documents relevant to their identity and bring the originals during the hearing. Specific examples of relevant documents are : 

 

  • New birth certificates with their revised gender identity or orientation.  
  • A marriage certificate proving matrimony with someone of their preferred gender or sexual orientation. 
  • Memberships in recognized LGBTQ+ organizations. 
  • Sworn affidavits from people who confirm the gender identity or sexual orientation of the person. 

 

The questions from the judge or office arising in this aspect must be appropriate, meaningful, and relevant to the concern in hand. 

 

For more information, it is most advisable to consult with our Immigration attorneys who specialize in Asylum laws and serving the queer community. We promise to be of service to you and fulfill our duties to give you the justice you are looking for. 

 

What is the time frame for visa processing in the United States?

Visa processing in the United States, although is looked after by the most appropriate professionals with laws guarding it, might not be the most predictable procedure in the administrative curriculum of the country.

 

There is no one processing time to predict when it comes to a visa application process in the U.S. As the U.S. administration reviews every application process on a case-by-case footing thereby the reviewing process can vary with the kind of immigration process in concern.

 

Usually, for temporary non Immigrant visas, the time frame goes till a few weeks or months whereas immigrant visa applicants can take up to years. The US visa processing time depends on the type of visa that one is applying for.

After the processing, the applicant is likely to receive a reply of affirmation on the application, and the consulate is to deliver the document. The delivery of the visa can take up to two other workdays.

 

On average, the processing duration for each of the visas is as follows :

  • E1 visa: 2 to 4 weeks i.e. almost a month
  • E2 visa: 4 to 6 weeks i.e. more than a month
  • E3 visa: 2 months
  • F1 visa: A few days, comparatively shorter than the other visa application processes.
  • F2 visa: Few days to 2 weeks i.e. up to 14 days
  • J1 visa: 1 to 4 months
  • Q1 visa: 15 days to 3 months
  • M1 visa: 4 weeks on a minimum
  • B1 visa: Few weeks to 2 months
  • B2 visa: Similar to B1, this takes a duration of a couple of weeks to 2 months too.
  • H1B visa : 3 to 6 months
  • H1B1 visa: 4 to 6 months
  • H2A visa: Generally it takes no more than 120 days but as it is seasonal in nature, the time duration varies.
  • H3 visa: 4 to 6 weeks
  • H4 visa: As it is dependent on the H-type visa holder i.e. a spouse or parent, therefore the time duration depends on the time taken to process their visa.
  • L1 visa : 3 to 4 months
  • L2 visa: 15 days to 1 month
  • R1 visa: 8 to 9 months
  • P1 visa : 3 to 6 months
  • I visa: 10 days
  • O visa: 2 to 3 months
  • C visa: 5 working days
  • T visa: Being dependent on the applicant’s status and the evidence of deserving the visa they provide to the authorities, the duration varies.
  • U visa: 12 to 18 months

 

Applications facing refusal under Section 221(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) pending further processing, can take up to 60 days the processing from the date of the visa interview. In certain situations, the processing might take more than 6 months.

 

Applicants who are required to apply for a waiver of ineligibility to obtain the visa should be aware that they might have to wait for up to 6 to 8 months from the date of their interview in order to get a reply.

 

It must be taken note that during cases of emergency, the State Department grants appointments and interview processing in an expedited time frame provided the U.S. embassy or consulate of the country of the applicant is well informed beforehand.

An evolution of the EB-5 investor visa program

An evolution of the EB-5 investor visa program

A major milestone has been created in the EB-5 reform and Integrity Act in 2022, which has raised the expectations of the people. 

 

Although the reform had come into effect in 1990, the reason for such intense hype created around the United States regarding the developments in the EB-5 investor visa reform is because it has been long pending and debated on several occasions, notably since 2015.  

 

The main points of concern regarding the EB-5 program are : 

  • The minimum amount to be invested has remained unaltered since 1990.
  • There is a lack of access for the relatively less developed and rural areas to appeal to foreign and large-scale investment directly. 
  • The integrity of the visa program from a futuristic point of view. 

 

Since originally the program was meant to be a model without a vision of permanence, the model has gained attention over time. Gradually, it has led to its expansion within a time period of three to five years accordingly as short extensions.

 

In 2015 it had been noticed that the program had reached its summit in terms of popularity, thereby bringing forth several discussions concerning it. A glaring reason for the popularity of the EB-5 is due to the ten-year waiting period associated with it instead of the longer periods required to acquire an employment-based US citizenship green card. And after eight long years, the discussions, legislative formalities, debates had led to significant changes from the end of 2021 to the early phase of 2022. 

 

The turbulent changes which have been applied in existence in the recent development are – 

  • The regional center program has been revived for five years at higher pricing, undergoing a United States Immigration and Citizenship service audit. According to the investors, the Regional Center program is a more popular route for potential EB-5 visa applicants. 
  • Shorter processing duration for the investments, preferably six months for the issuance of I-526 petitions and I-829 petitions within a year. This step still requires a clear study from the Department of Homeland Security on the process of achieving it.
  • Rising the investment amount up to $800,000 for high employment investments and rural areas, i.e., in the TEAs (Targeted Employment Areas), whereas $1,050,000 for other ventures and plans, i.e., the non TEAs.
  • 20% of the visas granted in a year will be petitioned for the newly formed rural categories, 10% for areas of high unemployment, and 2% for investments in infrastructure projects and plans. 
  • There is a new addition of two fees: $20,000 for the annual regional center fee and $1,000 for investor filings.
  • Safeguarding the existing investors against the expiration of the program of EB-5 immigrant visas in the future days, thereby eradicating any probable uncertainty faced by the applicants in the last eight months.
  • Concurrent filing of the EB-5 program by the ones already living in the States but under a different visa category. 

 

It can be hoped that these developments will give rise to a positive change in the program and will lay a worthwhile opportunity for the potential future immigrants of the United States for a better tomorrow.

 

Another route for the pursuance of an EB-5 visa is the golden visa, which requires an investment of $500,000 in the employment sectors of America.  

 

Temporary Protected Status (TPS), enough for refugees of Ukraine?

Temporary Protected Status (TPS), enough for refugees of Ukraine?

 

An important decision was taken on March 3, 2022, fortifying the fate of the desolated Ukraine refugees in the United States. 

 

As proclaimed by the Department of Homeland Security, Ukraine will be given access to Temporary Protected Status, aka TPS, for a period of 18 months to immigrants who had been inhabiting the country before March 1, 2022. 

 

The ones deciding to move to the country post-March one will not be granted the status.

 

The Temporary Protected Status focuses on certain points of concern. 

  • It has a historical reputation of being used as a tool of remedy for migrants who are unable to return to their native country safely. 
  • It allows immigrants to stay, work and travel without the probability of deportation. 
  • It does not provide permanent US citizenship to the immigrants, but the beneficiaries can apply for permanent residency or citizenship. 
  • The United States has extended the grant of TPS to several other countries that are suffering from national conflict. 

 

Although the status has been historically appreciated and has served as a relief to many such aggrieved individuals, the Temporary Protected Status does not solve the issue for every immigrant unanimously. 

 

  • TPS is granted solely to immigrants who have catered to the goodwill of the States and have been residing in the country already.
  • The process of granting the status takes a long duration which might not act in favor of the ones desperate for refuge and safety.
  • Owing to the temporary intent of the TPS, it becomes a complicated affair to escort their loved ones who are stuck in their concerned country facing conflict while the processing goes on. 
  • Due to the wait and the limitation of duration, the approval for the status of protection is only given to some while many of them are denied. 
  • To be granted the status, it requires documents of their nationality, employment, education, etc., from the applicants. But as the applicants are usually in an aggrieved situation and incidentally might not bear the requisite documents with themselves. Thereby making them unsuitable for the status even when they most require it. 
  • If, by unfortunate circumstances, the TPS is removed from the country the immigrants hail from, they will return to being unprotected, which might also result in them having to leave their place of refuge or the US in this case. 

 

Therefore the Biden administration should consider the factors at the earliest to ensure more secure protection for the victims of national conflict and the global crime of war. 

Special situations call for extraordinary measures, and it can be fairly well esteemed that the current situation of the Ukraine – Russia tension is a global threat, thereby certainly rare. So there should be more protected measures to provide swift and immediate solutions for the innocent people in peril.

changes in the u.s immigration law till now 2022

Changes in the U.S. Immigration Law till now (2022)

 

With the onset of the Covid 19 pandemic all around the globe, the immigration law of the United States has had to face several dilemmas and backlogs. 

 

Therefore in 2022, the Biden administration has brought forth a number of policies developed over time. 

 

The developments are listed here as follows: 

  • More clarity and a broadened area in international STEM talent. In the Optional Practical Training Programme (OPT), DHS has announced 22 new avenues of study and research have been introduced for better opportunities. It also includes a process for the public to express their opinion on whether to include or remove degrees from the new listed avenues. 
  • J-1 exchange visitors can be enrolled in a pre-doctoral program for an extension of practical training up to 36 months in 2022 and 2023.
  • Proficient entrepreneurs with notable achievements can qualify for O-1 visa classifications even for those relating to specific evidence in STEM fields with distinct definitions of ” field of endeavor,” accomplishments in related occupations, and use of evidence to keep up with the criteria. 
  • EB-2 NIW expansion – USCIS has announced that NIW (National Interest Waiver) has proposed new guidelines which require ” evidentiary consideration ” for adjudication requests of national interest waiver. 
  • In November 2021, the Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) requirement for the L2 and E2 spouses to work was abolished. From January 2022, the respective spouses shall have the allowance to obtain a ” spousal designation ” in their I-94 records from Customs and Border Protection for I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Purposes. 
  • Owing to the pandemic in 2020, Homeland Security had announced the consideration of the requirement of physical presence being surrendered in the I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. Under the administration, this policy has been extended till April 30, 2022, in the interest of the employees working in faraway settings due to COVID 19. 

 

The employees will have to conduct a verification of identity and employment eligibility by being physically present within three days of returning to the work location. 

  • In 2021, there have been several settlements relating to discrimination against the employees under Program Electronic Review Management (PERM) recruitment and H2B visa sponsorship programs. 


  • Under the Build Back Better Reconciliation Bill, more business immigrant visas will be available by


  • Acquiring unused visas from 1992 to 2021.
  • Preserving the availability of Diversity visas from 2017 to 2021.
  • Immigrants with approved employment-based visas and priority dates for an extended two years away can file applications for adjustment of status at an extra charge of $1,500 fee. With the increase in the filing fees through this bill, the auxiliary fees will be included in the general funds of the U.S. Treasury.
  • Introduction of Dignity Act is a pathway for permanent citizenship of undocumented immigrants in lieu of mandatory E-verify and border protection. 

 

It can also be anticipated that the processing efficiency of the visas will improve to keep up with the backlogs from the pandemic phase, and more workers will be hired for more advancement of the system. 

 

are us citizens eligible to apply for green cards for their siblings

Are U.S. citizens eligible to apply for green cards for their siblings?

 

If you’re trying to help your brother or sister achieve legal residency in the United States, you might be able to file a petition on their behalf under federal law. Like any other sort of immigration, the process can be complicated and time-consuming, requiring a significant deal of paperwork, documentation, and patience. It is in your best interests to speak with a skilled family-based immigration attorney at Gehi & Associates to guarantee that your sibling can join you in the United States. It’s also likely that you’ll be able to gain residence for your sibling’s spouse and children.

 

Who is eligible to file a Sibling Immigration Petition?

You must be at least 21 years old and a U.S. citizen to file a petition on behalf of a sibling. You cannot file a petition for a sibling if you are a lawful permanent resident.

 

You’ll also have to show proof of your relationship with your brother or sister. It is not necessary for siblings to be biologically related to one another. Siblings in the United States are defined as:

 

Siblings who have at least one biological parent in common.

Stepbrothers and stepsisters who were 18 years old or younger when their parents married and who are still married to their parents.

Adopted siblings who were both under the age of 16 at the time of adoption.

 

What is the Procedure for Petitioning a Sibling for Permanent Residence in the United States?

 

The U.S. citizen must first file a Form I-130 with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to begin the petition process (USCIS). If the petition is authorized, the paperwork will be sent to the consulate or embassy of the United States in the home country of the foreign citizen sibling, and a visa interview will be organized.

 

If the sibling is already legally present in the United States and the quota is still available, they may be entitled to apply for adjustment of status. Before starting the petition process, you must speak with an experienced immigration attorney to learn about your alternatives.

 

Unfortunately, even if a petition is authorized, it might take years for a sibling’s case to be approved because it is a fourth preference immigration category with a limited number of visas available each year.

 

In a USCIS application, who counts as a sibling?

 

There are many different sorts of families in today’s society, but someone who is “like a brother” or “the same as a sister” will not be enough to receive a green card for a sibling. The following individuals, however, may be eligible for a green card.

 

  • Brother or sister with same birth parents
  • Half sibling
  • Stepbrother or stepsister
  • Adopted sibling

The marriage or divorce certificate of their parents, or adoption certificates, may be required in some sibling green card applications to prove further the family tie between the U.S. citizen and the green card applicant.

 

Is it possible to appeal a denial of a sibling immigration petition?

If the USCIS declines your sibling’s petition, the denial will include a rationale for the refusal as well as options for appealing the denial. It is to your best advantage to speak with an expert immigration attorney at this stage to help you understand how to meet USCIS standards and your prospects of success if you decide to appeal.

 

One of the most prevalent reasons for the denial is that USCIS has found that the family relationship was not real or recognized by immigration law. A knowledgeable attorney will assist you, and your sibling gathers acceptable evidence of your kinship and defending your case in court. To discuss your options, contact Gehi & Associates as soon as possible.

 

Immigration Lawyers in New York for Families

 

Filing for permanent residency on a sibling’s behalf is time-consuming and can take years. Consult with the New York immigration lawyers at Gehi & Associates as soon as possible to help secure the success of your application. Our legal staff has assisted a number of people in obtaining legal status for their siblings. To learn more about our services, please get in touch with us.

 

For any U.S. Citizenship related advice:

  • Visit us at www.gehilaw.com
  • Contact us at 718-263-5999
  • Email us at info@gehilaw.com

 

dignity act immigration bill which helps undocumented immigrants

‘Dignity Act’ Immigration Bill – That helps Undocumented Immigrants.

 

The ‘Dignity Act’ is a law that protects people’s dignity. Mandatory E-Verify, a Path to Citizenship, and Border Security are all included in the immigration bill.

 

Democrats in Congress attempted to incorporate immigration reforms in the Build Back Better Act (BBBA) in December 2021. Some of the suggestions would have aided undocumented immigrants by granting parole and work authorization to eligible individuals. Green card backlogs would have been lessened, and certain applicants would have received expedited green cards for a price under the bill. However, the BBBA has not materialized.

 

The Dignity Act was sponsored by Republican congressman Maria Elvira Salazar (R-Fla.) and other Republican supporters as a “rebuttal” to the BBBA. The Dignity Act proposes a remedy for undocumented immigrants and modifications to the H-2A and H-2B temporary season worker visa programs in exchange for securing the border and making E-Verify mandatory.

 

The Dignity Act’s Most Important Provisions:

 

  1. Border Enforcement and Security

 

  1. Authorizes money to completely safeguard the United States border at no expense to taxpayers.
  2. Uses the most up-to-date border technology, such as radar, cameras, infrared, secure communications, and autonomous detection.
  3. Restarts all border infrastructure contracts that have been suspended and boost financing for physical border infrastructure.
  4. Hires 3,000 new DHS border security officers, with military veterans and law enforcement agents being prioritized.
  5. Establishes a task team to find and demolish cartel smuggling tunnels on the southern border.
  6. Requires 100% countrywide e-verification to ensure that all American firms hire lawful labor.
  7. Increases criminal penalties for unlawful border crossings and deports criminal illegal immigrants quickly.
  8. Allows US authorities to pursue transnational criminals, smugglers, human traffickers, drug traffickers, and gangs such as MS-13 that operate outside of the US.
  9. Creates four Regional Processing Centers to hold asylum seekers at the border, putting a halt to the catch-and-release policy while cases are resolved.
  10. Enacts a judicial policy of last-in, first-out to reduce the multi-year backlog in immigration courts.
  11. Hires 1,700 new immigration court employees to expedite the adjudication of asylum claims.
  12. Brings law, order, and increased development to Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, halting irregular migration from Central America and addressing the core reasons for northern migration.
  13. Addressing Immigrants in the United States.
  14. Border Enforcement and Security.
  15. Provides Dreamers with immediate legal status and an expedited path to citizenship.
  16. Dignity Program (10 Years): Undocumented immigrants will be given a chance to work, obtain legal status, pay reparations, and make amends with the law under the 10-year Dignity Program. They must follow all federal and state regulations, pass a criminal background check, work or provide care for a family, and pay taxes. To begin the program, they must contribute to the American Worker Fund. The Dignity program gives work authorization and protection against removal proceedings as long as the prerequisites are followed. During the 10-year program, participants must pay $10,000 in reparations, check-in with DHS every two years, and maintain good public standing.
  17. The Dignity Program excludes those enrolled in it from federal means-tested benefits or entitlements. They will be net contributors to tax revenue and the economy of the United States.
  18. The Redemption Program (+5 years): The Redemption Program is voluntary, and to begin it, persons must first finish the 10-year Dignity Program. It will provide an opportunity for repentance and a more permanent legal status. The 5-year Redemption Program demands participants to study English and American civics, and it allows people seeking permanent legal status to give back to their community through local volunteer work, national community service, or enhanced donations to the American Worker Fund. It also expands eligibility for existing citizenship paths but does not create a new one. Those that applied would be placed at the rear of the line.
  19. Before the Redemption Program can commence, a fully functional required e-verify system and a properly secure border certification must be achieved.
  20. The Workforce and Economy in the United States
  21. Establishes a free-of-charge American Worker Fund using reparation payments from the Dignity and Redemption programs. This program gives funding to citizens of the United States for workforce education initiatives, apprenticeship programs, and Career and Technical Education to enable Americans to pursue new jobs.
  22. For every $10,000 paid in the Dignity program by one immigrant, at least two American workers can be retrained.
  23. Develops and implements a market-based solution to our labor shortages by expanding and modernizing the H-2A Agricultural Guest Worker program to meet workforce demands.
  24. Revises the outmoded definition of farming to match modern-day farming practices, establishing a policy that benefits all farmers, producers, and ranchers in the United States.
  25. Ensures a resilient and stable agricultural commodities supply chain by providing wage stability for farmers.
  26. Fights food price inflation so that families may continue to buy low-cost groceries and a wide range of items made on American farms.
  27. Incorporates the H-2B Returning Worker Exception Act, which ensures that small and seasonal enterprises can meet their workforce needs and contribute to the post-pandemic economic recovery of our country.

 

will i be able to find a new job if my green card expires?

Will I Be Able to Find a New Job If My Green Card Expires?

 

Many permanent residents put off renewing their green cards until the last minute. They move across the country with expired green cards, believing that they do not need to utilize them in their daily lives. They ignore the fact that their green cards have expired. However, these green card holders are presumably unaware of the law’s provisions.

Everyone who has been given lawful permanent resident status in the United States will be awarded a paper or card of alien registration, which they must carry with them at all times, according to Section 264 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). As a result, green card holders must understand that they must renew their expiring or expired cards and maintain a valid card at all times. Permanent residents who fail to comply with the INA’s provisions shall be judged to have committed a misdemeanor.

People may feel that renewing their green cards will cost a lot of money, but they don’t realize that the implications of having an expired card might be far more expensive. Although one’s permanent resident status may not be jeopardized by having an expired green card, the expired card can pose complications, particularly when looking for new employment in the United States.

For all new employees hired in the United States, employers must complete Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. This form is used to verify that new workers are permitted to work here and validate their identity. Legal permanent residents will be asked to show their legitimate green cards when filling out this form. Employers may refuse to accept green cards that aren’t valid. As a result, it will be difficult to start new jobs if your green card has expired.

Permanent residents may establish their identity by presenting their foreign passports with the temporary I-551 stamp. If their passports aren’t stamped, they’ll have to get them stamped, which may take a long time. However, this does not preclude legal permanent residents from working in the United States if their green cards have expired. Even if they have I-551 stamps on their passports, they will need to renew their green cards. As a result, it’s a good idea to double-check that their permanent cards are still valid.

Similarly, several American states require permanent residents to have valid green cards in order to apply for professional licenses such as nurses or insurance agents. It will be difficult to obtain permits for certain occupations if your green card has expired.

Renew your permanent residence card within six months of its expiration date to avoid getting into problems. If your green card has already expired, start the renewal procedure now by filing Form I-90, Application to Replace/Renew Permanent Resident Card. You will not be penalized for renewing your expired green card.

why the dignity act is the key to fixing the immigration system

Why the Dignity Act is the key to fixing the Immigration System?

 

The world-known American culture and history have been shaped by immigration. But in spite of a major ratio of the population of America being immigrants and catering to the country’s best interests for a long time, they had not been bestowed with the most immigration-friendly rights on their plate. 

 

Maria Elvira Salazar, Representative of Miami Republic, had introduced a residency program in the form of legislation for the betterment of the immigrants of the U.S. 

 

  • The 483 paged bill by Salazar constructs a solid path of allowance of citizenship in the USA with completion of programs in over 15 years. 
  • It incorporates initiatives to increase border security.
  • It includes a program for seekers of asylum. 
  • It includes legal residential rights to immigrants who have not been documented on the authorized papers of the country. 

 

The key provisions of the act are as follows : 

  • A path to becoming a citizen for the Dreamers and holders of temporary protected status.
  •  This Dignity Act, which is a bill in relation to the Dignity Programme, gives an allowance to work in the United States for a period of 10 years. And it mandates an annual payment of $10,000 to the fund for employment training. 
  • After ten years’ tenure, the Dignity Program participants will have an option to participate in a Redemption program which will lay down the path for permanent residence and the United States citizenship. The program features requirements of
  1. i) Having knowledge about English and Civics
  2. ii) Engaging in local volunteer work

iii) Paying a residual amount of $7,500

  • Providing funds for border security, i.e., physical security technological security, alongside hiring 3,000 new security personnel for U.S. Customs and Border Protection + Homeland Security.
  • Extend the Agricultural Guest Work Programme and take care of the seasonal labor requirements. 
  • Abiding by the cause by housing asylum applicants at the border with a count of 1,700 new personnel to look into the cases. 
  • Nationwide E-verify.

 

At the end of 2021, Democrats of Congress had proposed reforms for the inclusion of immigration in a certain act termed to be Build Back Better Act (BBBA), which had precisely aimed to aid the undocumented immigrants of the United States with parole and authorization work. The BBBA also had included steps for diminishing reserves pertinent to the green card and providing certain applicants with the citizenship card in lieu of a fee. But owing to circumstances, the act did not get passed. 

 

Congresswoman Salazar with other Republicans introduced the Dignity Act, referring to it as a ” rebuttal ” to the previously planned BBBA. 

 

The most noteworthy point about this U.S. citizenship and immigration services friendly proposal is that it promises an assured future for unauthorized and undocumented immigrants while taking care of the visa programs of H-2A and H-2B during the seasonal labor phase in lieu of ordaining E-verify and Border security.